Top Ten Picnic Spots in the FLX!

Photo: Andy Zepp

Top Ten Picnic Spots in the Finger Lakes Region!

May is National Barbecue Month! Enjoying a picnic or barbecue is one of the most enjoyable warm-weather activities to share with friends and family. The Finger Lakes offers ideal locations with amenities such as picnic tables, grills, restrooms, and plenty of gorgeous scenery. If dining outdoors by a picturesque lake or waterfall is your thing, we invite you to explore our top ten favorite spots in the region.

Photo: Tim Starmer

Birdseye Hollow State Forest

This 3,446-acre state forest in Bath has two day-use areas, two paddling opportunities—Sanford Lake and Birdseye Hollow Pond– and nearly 11 miles along the Finger Lakes Trail. Pavilions and picnic benches dot both of the day-use areas with other amenities to boot. The 18-acre Sanford Lake has an easily accessible boat launch, while Birdseye Hollow Pond has a fishing pier and direct access to the trail network.

Photo: Tom Reimers

Buttermilk Falls State Park

Located at the southern edge of Ithaca, this popular state park has an upper and lower section, both offering plenty of recreational opportunities. At the base of Buttermilk Falls is a verdant lawn, the perfect setting for a picnic with a gorgeous waterfall in view. The upper section of the park includes 1.5 miles (one way) of hiking trails, picnic areas with grills, and Lake Treman.

Photo: Nigel Kent

Fillmore Glen State Park

This beautiful park in the quiet village of Moravia features campgrounds, a swimming area, and stunning waterfalls. Stone-walled paths, numerous bridges that crisscross the oddly named Dry Creek, and stone staircases are thoughtfully blended with the stunning natural setting of this deep gorge. The whole family can enjoy these natural marvels with plenty of picnic tables and pavilion spaces to spend a day in the park.

Photo: Helen Heizyk

Finger Lakes Museum

Nestled in the quiet hamlet of Branchport, sits the Finger Lakes Museum which offers public access to Keuka Lake via Sugar Creek. The museum’s 16-acre Townsend-Grady Wildlife Preserve, located at the north end of the west branch of the lake, has a series of maintained trails and a boardwalk with a beautiful octagon pavilion. Here, you can enjoy a picnic lunch by accessing the pavilion on foot from the hiking trail, or by canoe or kayak, tying off at the small craft dock on the lake.

Photo: Chris Ray

Green Lakes State Park

There are several picnic areas and pavilions to choose from at this unique state park in Fayetteville, including one overlooking the sandy swimming area. With nearly 20 miles of trails, old-growth forests, two pristine lakes, and boat rentals, there are numerous ways to get outside and enjoy a full day at Green Lakes State Park.

Photo: Nigel Kent

Harriet Hollister Spencer Recreation Area

With picturesque panoramic views of Honeoye Lake and its steep-sided valley, Harriet Hollister offers a bit more solitude than the region’s lively state parks. A popular spot for Rochester-area recreationists, the recreation area offers over 20 miles of trails for hiking and biking. Visitors can enjoy a small picnic area with tables and benches located in the main park, or a bench on the Overlook Trail.

Photo: Steve Knapp

Keuka Outlet Trail

Considered one of the best multiuse trails in the region, this 6.8-mile pathway stretches from Penn Yan to Dresden and follows a winding stream with two impressive waterfalls. The most notable is Seneca Mill Falls located at about the midpoint of the trail near the pavilion at the Lion Bruce Hansen Memorial Park. Many people stop here to view the falls and picnic.

Photo: Nigel Kent

Ontario County Park at Gannett Hill

Enjoy a full day at this community park which features picnic areas with tables and grills, ball fields, restrooms, play structures, and pavilions. This 400-acre county park has a vast network of trails, over 10 miles in total, which weave through the woodland and over steepened hillsides of the Bristol Valley. The popular “Jump Off” overlook offers a stunning panoramic view of the western horizon.

Photo: Tim Starmer

Sampson State Park

With a beautiful view of Seneca Lake at its center, Sampson State Park is ideal for enjoying a sunset barbecue or daytime picnic. With grills, restrooms, a swimming area, playgrounds, hiking trails, and more, there is something for everyone. And, as the former site of a World War II naval base and Korean War airfield, the site also holds particular appeal for military history enthusiasts.

Photo: Andy Zepp

Taughannock Falls State Park

While the iconic falls that are the namesake of this impressive park are undoubtedly its most popular attraction, an abundance of picnic areas also draw visitors to celebrate its charm. Grills and picnic tables dot the lakeside portion of the park, offering warm breezes and gorgeous views of Cayuga Lake. Equipped with state park amenities such as a swimming area, playground, and restrooms, there is even a summer concert series to entertain folks of all ages (currently on hold due to the pandemic).

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The Best Rail Trails in the FLX!

Photo: Chris Ray

The Best Rail Trails in the Finger Lakes Region!

Spring is here, and it’s the perfect time to explore the Finger Lakes region’s rail trails. Repurposed from abandoned rail lines, these mostly flat and broad pathways provide hikers, runners, and cyclists ample opportunities for getting outside and avoiding muddier trails. Traversing both urban and rural landscapes, multiuse rail trails often connect to other protected lands such as state parks. Explore some of the best in the region!

Photo: Jeff Katris

Black Diamond Trail

Though evocative of a hazardous downhill ski run, the 8.4-mile Black Diamond Trail is actually a broad, mostly level, multiuse trail. Its stone dust surface makes the trail a pleasure to ride on or to stroll along in what is essentially a picturesque tree-lined alleyway. The grade slopes downward most of the way from Taughannock Falls State Park in Trumansburg to Cass Park in Ithaca.

Photo: Bill Hecht

Catharine Valley Trail

The 14-mile Catharine Valley Trail follows the old Chemung Barge Canal tow path and sections of the abandoned Northern Central Rail lines. Contiguous from downtown Watkins Glen to Mark Twain State Park, it’s a great natural corridor that utilizes compact stone dust paths that are an absolute pleasure to walk or bike.

Photo: Dave Duprey

Cayuga-Seneca Canal Trail

The Cayuga-Seneca Canal Trail follows an old railroad bed beside a canal that links the two largest Finger Lakes while connecting picturesque villages along the way. Presently, 6.7 of the eventual 19 miles are finished and open to the public. Current access to the eastern end of the trail is in Waterloo while the western end can be accessed at Seneca Lake State park or at the Bishop Nature Preserve, owned by the Finger Lakes Land Trust.

Photo: Josh Baldo

Jim Schug Trail

The Jim Schug Trail weaves its way from Main Street in Dryden through Dryden Lake Park and ends at an intersection with the Finger Lakes Trail. The majority of the trail is flanked by swamps, wetlands, and ponds with the more remote and wild portions bordering Dryden Lake Park to the north and south. Currently 4.2 miles long, there are plans to extend the trail another 3.3 miles.

Photo: Steve Knapp

Keuka Outlet Trail

A winding stream accompanies hikers, runners, bikers and even equestrians along the 6.8-mile Keuka Outlet Trail. The trail follows a generally downhill course from the outlet of Keuka Lake in Penn Yan to the inlet along Seneca Lake in Dresden. The trail varies from paved sections in Penn Yann to broad stone dust paths to mixed gravel to worn single track.

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Locations Without Hunting in 2020

Photo: Bill Hecht

Go Finger Lakes Locations Without Hunting in 2020

With late fall in the Finger Lakes comes hunting season and many of your favorite trails and outdoor locations may be closed or have limited access. For anyone looking for open space and peace of mind without trail closures, explore this small list of places where hunting is not allowed during the fall and winter hunting season this year, October 1 through December 22, 2020.

Photo: Baltimore Woods

Baltimore Woods Nature Center

Rolling wooded hills, well-groomed trails, and varied niches make this small gem in Marcellus a must visit for all members of the family. Short trails through an arboretum as well as wildflower and herb gardens near the John A. Weeks Interpretive Center are perfect for those who just want a brief, easy stroll. The longer Valley, Boundary, and Field to Forest trails offer extended trips to expand the experience and are thoroughly enjoyable by hikers of all levels.

Photo: Brian Maley

Cornell Lab of Ornithology

The Cornell Lab of Ornithology, more commonly known as Sapsucker Woods, is a birding haven and great resource for long time birders and those with an aspiring interest. Four miles of trails wander through the 230-acre sanctuary, with multiple interconnected loops that can be intermixed for longer trips. The mostly level trails weave through deep woods, atop boardwalks in swamps, and beside ponds bursting with wildlife of all kinds.

Photo: Lime Hollow Nature Center

Lime Hollow Nature Center

Twelve miles of trails, open dawn to dusk year round, weave through meadow, forest, and scrub land, often neighboring or encircling the numerous ponds and varied wetlands found throughout the 430-acre property in Cortland. The deep forest sections found along the Mill Pond Trail feature large diameter trees that are reminiscent of the old growth forest found at Green Lakes State Park.

Photo: D. Elswit

Roy H. Park Preserve

An easy meandering trail accessed from the south parking area of this Finger Lakes Land Trust preserve in Dryden leads you through a meadow that encircles a beautiful evergreen plantation. Follow the spur trail and you will find yourself in a mature forest that leads to the hemlock-studded gorge and waterfalls along Six Mile Creek. Please note that while hunting is prohibited in the Roy H. Park Preserve, it is allowed in the adjacent Hammond Hill State Forest which can be accessed from the preserve’s northern entrance.

Photo: Vinnie Collins

Steege Hill Nature Preserve

The 793-acre Steege Hill Nature Preserve in Big Flats has seven miles of hiking trails and is the Finger Lakes Land Trust’s largest conservation area. Located on a hilltop high above the Chemung River, hikers can choose from a series of connected loop trails for longer or shorter hikes.

Photo: Gail Norwood

Tanglewood Nature Center

The Tanglewood Nature Center in Elmira is home to a six-mile trail system. Multiple loops of varying difficulty and length, allow for leisurely strolls in the meadows or more vigorous excursions through the woodland. The trails are peppered with placards that have quotes from Mark Twain whose wit and thoughts help frame our views of nature in new and amusing ways.

 

*The Baltimore Woods Interpretive Center, Cornell Lab of Ornithology and Lime Hollow visitor centers, and Tanglewood Nature Center Museum are currently closed in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Trails are open with social distancing practices in place.

*Please be advised that hunting may be occurring on adjacent properties. We encourage every outdoor enthusiast to wear blaze orange, pink, or another bright color, especially during fall and winter. Doing so will allow you to be seen more easily and from greater distances. Learn more about hiker safety during hunting season.

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Easygoing Hikes in the Finger Lakes

Photo: Matt Champlin

Easygoing Autumn Hikes for Families and Seniors in the Finger Lakes Region

The Finger Lakes region is known for its rugged gorges, forested hillsides, and eleven awe-inspiring lakes. However, not all outdoor adventures require you to exceed your comfort level or ability. For families, seniors, or anyone looking for a leisurely stroll, there are many beautiful places to explore the natural and cultural history of our region.

Photo: Tim Starmer

Catharine Valley Trail

The Catharine Valley Trail is contiguous from downtown Watkins Glen to the hamlet of Pine Valley. It’s a great natural corridor that utilizes compact stone dust paths that are an absolute pleasure to walk or bike. Birdwatching opportunities await at the nearby Queen Catharine Marsh, accessible from the trail. When complete, the route will be roughly 12 miles long and will connect the communities of Watkins Glen, Montour Falls, Millport, Pine Valley and Horseheads.

Photo: Dave Duprey

Cayuga-Seneca Rail Trail

This trail follows an old railroad bed beside the Cayuga-Seneca Canal. The western end can be accessed by parking at Seneca Lake State Park or at the Bishop Nature Preserve, owned by the Finger Lakes Land Trust. The preserve has a large gravel parking area off West River Road and a newly constructed path that connects directly to the trail. Once on the canal trail, you can walk or bike along a broad, level, stone dust trail. Free of obstructions, the path allows you to take in the sights of the pastoral landscape.

Photo: Cornell Botanic Gardens

Cornell Botanic Gardens

There is something for everyone at the Cornell Botanic Gardens, formerly known as the Cornell Plantations.  There are hiking trails, nature walks, gardens, ponds, woodlands, meadows, glens, and more. The more cultivated and landscaped gardens and arboretum are ideal for young children, elderly parents, or simply for anyone wishing for a leisurely stroll.

Photo: Nigel Kent

Ganonondagan State Historic Site 

Experience firsthand the customs and beliefs of the Seneca at Ganondagan State Historic Site. Open year-round, the 7.6-mile trail system features a series of interconnected paths that can be adjusted for longer or shorter hikes. The Trail of Peace is a 0.8-mile mowed loop trail which passes the Bark Longhouse and details Seneca oral tradition, how the Haudenosaunee became a confederacy, and the story of the original town of Ganondagan. Visitors can also enjoy a variety of birds that inhabit the meadows here along this mostly level path.

Photo: Sarah Nickerson

Labrador Hollow Unique Area

The most popular destination in Labrador Hollow is the universally accessible, quarter-mile path to Tinker Falls. Tinker Falls is a stunning example of a “hanging” falls.  Its origin dates back to when New York and much of the North American continent was part of an inland sea.  Additionally, the Labrador Hollow accessible boardwalk is nearly 2,000 feet in length and traverses a diverse wetland complex that provides a glimpse of New York’s flora and fauna.

Photo: Tanglewood Nature Center

Tanglewood Nature Center 

The Tanglewood Nature Center features a variety of wildlife exhibits and a six-mile trail system. Multiple loops of varying difficulty and length, allow for leisurely strolls in the meadows or more vigorous excursions through the woodland.  The trails are peppered with placards that have quotes from Mark Twain whose wit and thoughts help frame our views of nature in new and amusing ways.

This list was compiled as a general guide for families and seniors wishing to get outdoors. Visitors should check the web site for each trail, nature center, etc., for specific details on closings and other restrictions due to Covid-19.

Other places to explore…

Black Diamond Trail 

Jim Schug Trail

Keuka Outlet Trail

Sampson State Park 

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Favorite Fall Hikes in the FLX!

Photo: Matt Champlin

Favorite Fall Hikes in the Finger Lakes Region

Cool weather has arrived and the summer crowds are gone. It’s fall hiking season in the Finger Lakes! Immerse yourself in the beauty of autumn by exploring some of these natural areas recommended by the Finger Lakes Land Trust. Put on a sweater, go leaf peeping, and be mindful of safety during fall and winter hunting seasons.

Photo: Baltimore Woods

Baltimore Woods Nature Center

Rolling wooded hills, well-groomed trails, and varied niches make this small gem a must visit for all members of the family. Short trails through an arboretum as well as wildflower and herb gardens near the John A. Weeks Interpretive Center are perfect for those who just want a brief, easy stroll. The longer Valley, Boundary, and Field to Forest trails offer extended trips to expand the experience and are thoroughly enjoyable by hikers of all levels.

Photo: Tim Starmer

Birdseye Hollow State Forest

The 3,446-acre Birdseye Hollow State Forest features nearly 11 miles of the Finger Lakes Trail, which winds its way mostly north to south through deciduous forest and conifer plantations. Deep woodlands and babbling brooks occupy the majority of the trail experience here, but there is also the short blue-blazed lakeside trail which offers ample wildlife viewing.

Photo: Tom Reimers

Buttermilk Falls State Park

The park’s namesake falls, Buttermilk Falls, lies beside the Gorge Trail which features beautiful stone walls and staircases that accentuate the scenery. At the end of the Gorge Trail, is the Bear Trail which connects to the upper section of the park and includes 1.5 miles (one way) of hiking trails, picnic areas and Lake Treman. On the loop trail around the lake, hikers can pick up the orange-blazed Finger Lakes Trail and extend their journey to nearby Lick Brook Gorge and on to Treman State Park. In all, there are roughly 8 miles of trails within the park, but visitors should be aware that the Gorge Trail is only open from early May to early November.

Photo: Chris Ray

Clark Reservation State Park

Clark Reservation State Park packs in a great deal of botanical and geological diversity in a small footprint. At the heart of the park is Glacier Lake, which is similar to the astoundingly unusual Green and Round Lakes at Green Lakes State Park. But unlike the level and groomed trails around the lakes at Green Lakes State Park, the trail that encircles Glacier Lake is rugged and wild in character. Other trails wind through deep forest and beside the lake’s outlet/swamp so there are multiple routes through a variety of niches.

Photo: Tom Reimers

Connecticut Hill Wildlife Management Area

In a region dominated by out-and-back hikes, the Connecticut Hill WMA boasts not one but two separate loop hikes: the Van Lone Loop and the Bob Cameron Loop. The 5.7 mile-long Van Lone Loop shares a section of the Finger Lakes Trail (FLT) which follows Cayuta Creek, while the 2.6 mile-long Bob Cameron Loop is near the FLT, but entirely separate.

Photo: Bill Hecht

High Tor Wildlife Management Area

There are over a dozen miles of hiking trails as well as a network of access roads in the 3,400-acre upland portion of High Tor WMA. No matter which approach you choose to reach the upland site, the climbing is steep. But, once you reach the top, the hiking and biking are fairly level. The trail system is a part, albeit only a short section, of the more extensive Bristol Hill Trail, a branch trail of the even longer Finger Lakes Trail.

Photo: Monika Wood

Steege Hill Nature Preserve

The 793-acre Steege Hill Nature Preserve has 7 miles of hiking trails and is the Finger Lakes Land Trust’s largest conservation area. Located on a hilltop high above the Chemung River, hikers can choose from a series of connected loop trails for longer or shorter hikes. The predominantly oak-hickory forest turns brilliant with fall colors, making autumn an excellent time to visit.

*A reminder to recreation enthusiasts that many parks, forests, and nature preserves allow hunting and trapping in designated periods. Go Finger Lakes would like to encourage all outdoor lovers to be especially mindful of safety during the fall and winter hunting seasons, from October 1-December 22.  We advise everyone to wear blaze orange, pink, or another bright color on outdoor adventures to be seen more easily and from greater distances.

Each location profile on Go Finger Lakes includes a link to the managing organization – whether it be the Finger Lakes Land Trust, a New York State agency, or a nature center – and visitors should consult that agency for hunting information BEFORE EACH OUTING.

Other places to explore…

Harriet Hollister Spencer Recreation Area

Pratt’s Falls County Park

Roy H. Park Preserve

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Kid-Friendly Outdoor Spots!

Photo: Edie Jodz

Kid-Friendly Outdoor Spots in the Finger Lakes

When school is out, it’s time for family fun outdoors. If hiking, swimming, biking, paddling, or camping is your thing, the Finger Lakes region has plenty of options for getting your kids outside. From state parks to nature centers and more, there is something for everyone. Here are a few of our favorite spots:

Photo: Tim Starmer

Catharine Valley Trail

Looking to take the kids for a walk or bike ride that doesn’t include climbing steep hills? The Catharine Valley Trail is contiguous from downtown Watkins Glen to the hamlet of Pine Valley. It’s a great natural corridor that utilizes compact stone dust paths that are an absolute pleasure to walk or bike. Birdwatching opportunities await at the nearby Queen Catharine Marsh, accessible from the trail. When complete, the route will be roughly 12 miles long and will connect the communities of Watkins Glen, Montour Falls, Millport, Pine Valley and Horseheads.

Photo: Lauren McLoughlin

Cumming Nature Center

Acting as the Rochester Museum & Science Center’s “living museum,” this 900-acre preserve does an exceptional job at just that. Separated into five thematically different loops, the excellent walking trails are full of historical and artful exhibits as well as informational placards. The trails here are well-marked, flat, easy, and explore an array of environs ranging from a thirty five-acre beaver pond, sections of scrub land, meandering wooded streams, open marshes, and deep forests.

Photo: Rick Lightbody

Ellis Hollow Nature Preserve

Need a break from the hassles of everyday life? A walk through the fern-carpeted forests of the Ellis Hollow Preserve could be just the thing. Only a 15-minute drive from downtown Ithaca, the preserve’s streams drain into Cascadilla Creek and offer the perfect opportunity for younger children to explore their shallow waters. The trail system here is just under two miles, making it an ideal location for those looking for a short hike.

Photo: Chris Ray

Green Lakes State Park

With nearly 20 miles of trails, old-growth forests, two pristine lakes, boat rentals, 137 camp sites, a sandy swimming beach, and even golf courses (traditional and disc versions), there are numerous ways to get outside and enjoy Green Lakes State Park. Summer is when the vast majority of visitors frequent the park, but it remains open year round and has equally stunning scenery and outdoor activities in other seasons.

Photo: Steve Knapp

Keuka Outlet Trail

Late in the twentieth century, recreation advocates blazed the way in repurposing this former tow path and rail-bed into one of the best multiuse trails in the region. The trail follows a generally downhill course from the outlet of Keuka Lake in Penn Yan to the inlet along Seneca Lake in Dresden. A winding stream and two impressive waterfalls accompany hikers, bikers and even equestrians along the 6.8 mile route. The most notable waterfall is Seneca Mill Falls located at about the midpoint of the trail near the pavilion at the Lion Bruce Hansen Memorial Park, where many people stop to view the falls and picnic.

Photo: Lime Hollow Nature Center

Lime Hollow Nature Center

Twelve miles of trails, open dawn to dusk year round, weave through meadow, forest, and scrub land, often neighboring or encircling the numerous ponds and varied wetlands found throughout the 430-acre property. A quarter mile trail, the Trail for All, is wheelchair accessible and a trail-ready wheelchair is available at the visitor center along McClean Road if needed. The center also acts as an information hub for budding naturalists through summer camps, forest preschool, and year round school programs.

Photo: Tim Starmer

Sampson State Park 

On the eastern shore of Seneca Lake in the town of Romulus lies Sampson State Park, the site of a former Air Force and Navy base. Today, there is a museum on-site dedicated to its history, but those looking for an outdoor adventure have plenty of options. Camping, a sandy beach with swimming, hiking along the shore of the lake, biking, and paddling are sure to please every member of the family.

Photo: Tanglewood Nature Center

Tanglewood Nature Center

This museum and nature center features a variety of wildlife exhibits, youth education programs, and summer camps. Hikers will find multiple trail loops of varying difficulty and length that allow for leisurely strolls through meadows or more vigorous excursions through woodland. An additional 50 acres and more trails are available at Personius Woods located on West Hill Road, where the family dog is welcome on-leash.

Photo: Nigel Kent

Taughannock Falls State Park

The waterfall that is this park’s namesake is one of the tallest waterfalls in New York State. A mile-long trail that leads to the falls is level and easily accessed, making it an excellent trip for all members of the family, from toddlers to grandparents and everyone in between. The lakeside portion of the park is home to a swimming beach, picnic areas, a playground, and boat slips.

Photo: Nigel Kent

Wesley Hill Preserve

Put down the devices and immerse your family in nature at the Finger Lakes Land Trust’s Wesley Hill Preserve. Diverse stands of mature forest, a wide array of wildflowers, and sweeping views of the hills surrounding Honeoye Lake’s southern end make this site truly special. Over five miles of hiking trails, a pond, and excellent examples of the area’s geologic history provide the perfect setting for nature discovery.

This list was compiled as a general guide for families wishing to get outdoors. Visitors should check the web site for each individual park, nature center, etc., for specific details on closings and other restrictions due to Covid-19.

Other places to explore…

Baltimore Woods Nature Center

Hemlock-Canadice State Forest

Shindagin Hollow State Forest

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Trailblazers!

Photo: FLLT

You’re Invited to Get Outdoors with Our Land Trust Volunteers

How does the Finger Lakes Land Trust maintain thousands of acres of nature preserves across a 12-county region with a small staff of only a few people?  Volunteers!  Sign up here!

The Land Trust operates over 30 nature preserves that are free and open to the public for quiet recreation.  You can see a few of them on the Go Finger Lakes map (find the tree icons) and you can see them all on our web site at fllt.org/map.  We care for them with our volunteer corps!

Here are a few photos of volunteers including our “Trailblazers,” who build trails, clear brush, construct signs, and generally care for the nature preserves, and others who help us host educational and recreational events that are open to the public.

fllt.org/volunteer

You can sign up to volunteer.

fllt.org/events

See our schedule of events.

Get your friends to sign up, too!

Volunteering is a great way to meet new people, do good work, and get outdoors in the beautiful Finger Lakes.

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FLX Animals

Photo: Tanglewood Nature Center

Favorite Animal Photos from the Finger Lakes

Here are some of our favorite animal photos, shot in the Finger Lakes region by volunteers of the Finger Lakes Land Trust and other folks on nature preserves across the region.

Thanks to our volunteers and partners for sharing!

Do you have great photos and videos of wildlife in our region?

Want to share with the Finger Lakes Land Trust?

Please contact us at gofingerlakes@fllt.org.

Your imagery can help advance conservation through our communications and outreach on the web, social media, print and more!

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Aerial FLX!

Photo: Bill Hecht

Favorite Airplane Photos of the Finger Lakes

Here are some of our favorite aerial photos of the lakes and natural areas across the region, sent by volunteers of the Finger Lakes Land Trust.  Help us save more land and water!

Thanks to our volunteers for sharing!

Do you have great photos and videos of our region?

Want to share with the Finger Lakes Land Trust?

Please contact us at gofingerlakes@fllt.org.

Your imagery can help advance conservation through our communications and outreach on the web, social media, print and more!

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